Greta Garbo

Greta Garbo – photos and quotes

Posted on Posted in Celebrity Portraits, Female Stars, Silent Film Stars

“I never said, ‘I wanted to be alone.’ I said, ‘I want to be left alone.’”Greta Garbo

Photo: C.S. Bull (1931)

 

 

Greta Garbo Mauritz Stiller

“I have to thank Mauritz Stiller for everything in this world.”Greta Garbo

Here she is, on her way to the U.S. with her mentor/director in 1925.

 

The Victorian Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica was Greta Garbo's first residence after she came to Los Angeles. It was demolished in the late 1930s. Bizarre Los Angeles.

The Victorian Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica was Greta Garbo’s first residence after she came to Los Angeles. It was demolished in the late 1930s. This is how it looked in 1890.

 

Greta Garbo Dean Cromwell

With USC track coach Dean Cromwell, 1925.

Greta Barbo

“Every one of us lives his life just once; if we are honest, to live once is enough.”Greta Garbo

Photographer: Ruth Harriet Louise (1926) 

 

Greta Garbo bored

“Here, it is boring, incredibly boring, so boring I can’t believe it’s true.”Greta Garbo describing her life in Hollywood in 1926.

 

Greta Garbo Vamp

“I hate vamps. I vant – what you call eet? – sympathy. I vant people to like me!” Greta Garbo

Source (and accent): Robert Moulton (1926)
Photographer: Ruth Harriet Louise

Greta Garbo Meets Leo the Lion Framed photo paper poster

Greta Garbo at Gay’s Lion Farm in El Monte, circa 1926. Photographer: Don Gillum. (Bizarre Los Angeles)

“When I first entered pictures in America, I was so new to American ways that many things happened to me that seemed tragic then, but seem funny now that I have got used to American customs. I believe that the most tragic thing of all was having to hurry. In Sweden, we take all the time we want. Usually the leading man is playing on the stage at the same time he is working in pictures, so everone sits around and waits until he is through with a matinee or rehearsal. But in America, everone is always busy. Even when the players are not working, they are having photographs made and gowns fitted. I could not get used to that, at first. I wanted to take my time and rest. Now, however, I like to rush and hurry.”Greta Garbo

Photo: At Gay’s Lion Farm in El Monte, circa 1926. Photographer: Don Gillum.

 

FILM PAIR REPORTED ENGAGED
Greta Garbo and Gilbert Both Noncommital But Rumor Says It’s So

Los Angeles Times (Sept. 17, 1926) The newest Hollywood romance is between Jack Gilbert and Greta Garbo, both under contract to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, according to well-founded rumors going the rounds of the film colony.

Neither Gilbert nor Miss Garbo would deny the report when questioned yesterday on the set where they are appearing in a film together for the first time.

“Please ask Mr. Gilbert,” Miss Garbo said. Not to be outdone, Jack directed all inquiries to Miss Garbo.

It is common gossip in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer lot that the screen pair are much in love and that there is more than acting in their love scenes together.

Gilbert, when pressed as to the truth of the engagement rumor said: “I wish I could say more, but you must ask Miss Garbo.”

According to the report, the engagement is meeting with opposition from studio officials.

Photo: On the set The Flesh and the Devil (1926). With John Gilbert and director Clarence Brown.

 

 

Greta Garbo John Gilbert

“I will be very frank with you. The only one I have gone out with at all is Mr. Gilbert. Many things have been written about my friendship with Mr. Gilbert. But it is only a friendship. I will never marry. My work absorbs me. I have time for nothing else. But I think Jack is one of the finest men I have ever known. He is a real gentleman. He has temperament. He gets excited. Sometimes he has much to say. But that is good. I am very happy when I am told that I am to do a picture with Mr. Gilbert. He is a great artist. He lifts me up, and carries me along with him. It is not scenes I am doing — I am living.”Greta Garbo

Source: Rilla Page Palmborg (1931)

 

Photography Prints

 

Greta Garbo 1928

Circa 1928

 

Wild Orchids Nils Asther Greta Garbo Lewis Stone

Wild Orchids (1929). With Lewis Stone and Nils Asther.

 

Image result for greta garbo gif

 

Greta Garbo

“Life would be so wonderful if we only knew what to do with it.”Greta Garbo

 

 

Greta Garbo

“It is almost impossible to do business with her. The officials were trying to get her to play a certain role. They argued with her for three hours, until they were congratulating themselves that she was finally convinced. But at the end of all the talk, she merely said, ‘I t’ink I go home.’ And walked out. That’s her final word on everything. ‘I t’ink I go home.’ She does.”John Gilbert 

 

Greta Garbo 1929

“These people, why they write to me? I do not know them. Me, poor little Sweden girl. Why do they want my picture?”Greta Garbo

Source: Alice L. Tildseley (1929)
Photographer: Nickolas Muray (1929)

 

Greta Garbo 1930

“I was born. I had a father and mother. I lived in a house. I went to school. What does it matter?”Greta Garbo

Source: Herb Michelson (1957)
Photo: C.S. Bull (1930)

 

Greta Garbo 1930

“They are making sound movies here now and nobody knows what is to happen to me. Perhaps, I will not stay here much longer. Already some of the top stars intend leaving Hollywood, and it is questionable for how long I will remain a film tramp.”Greta Garbo, in a letter she wrote to her friend Wilhelm Sorenson in 1929.

Source: David Bret, “Greta Garbo: A Divine Star”
Photo: C.S. Bull (1930)

 

"I am not mysterious. It is just that I like to be alone." -- Greta Garbo (Bizarre Los Angeles)

“I am not mysterious. It is just that I like to be alone.”Greta Garbo

Source: Alice L. Tildseley (1929)

Photo: C.S. Bull (1930)

 

Greta Garbo

“There is no one who would have me…I can’t cook.”Greta Garbo

Photo: Ruth Harriet Louise

 

Art Prints

 

Greta Garbo Charles Bickford Anna Christie 1930

“I didn’t want to play in the picture because it was a starring vehicle for Garbo. No, I didn’t know Garbo and hadn’t even seen her. There was nothing personal in it whatsoever. I just didn’t want to be stuck in to support a star. As I say, I didn’t know Garbo. I know her now. She’s a great trouper and a magnificent artist who regards the play as the thing above all else. It was great to work with her.” — Charles Bickford

Source: Keith Richards (1930)

Photo: Anna Christie (1930)

 

Greta Garbo sits

“She like me and she is so nice, Miss Garbo. She never says much. She just sits and thinks.” — film star Fifi D’Orsay (not pictured) on her first meeting with Garbo.

The two met at the Russian Eagle Restaurant in Hollywood around 1930. Rumors soon started that they were dating.

 

Greta Garbo art“Masque de Greta Garbo à la meche” (1930) by Spanish sculptor Pablo Gargallo.

 

Greta Garbo

“Being a movie star, and this applies to all of them, means being looked at from every possible direction. You are never left at peace, you’re just fair game.”Greta Garbo. (Likely crafted by a publicist)

Photo: Clarence Sinclair Bull

 

"It is difficult to dress Greta Garbo. She has foreign ideas about clothes that do not go well in pictures. She wants short skirts when she should have long ones. She has many dislikes. She will wear nothing with fur on it, if she can have her way. She wants neither lace nor velvet garments. She goes in for flaunting, bizarre collars and cuffs. And her figure - it is difficult to dress." -- Andre Ani, MGM designer (Bizarre Los Angeles)

“It is difficult to dress Greta Garbo. She has foreign ideas about clothes that do not go well in pictures. She wants short skirts when she should have long ones. She has many dislikes. She will wear nothing with fur on it, if she can have her way. She wants neither lace nor velvet garments. She goes in for flaunting, bizarre collars and cuffs. And her figure – it is difficult to dress.” — Andre Ani, MGM designer

Source: Rilla Page Palmborg (1931)

 

"Dresses. I wish they were all bags and all alike, to jump into quick." -- Greta Garbo (Bizarre Los Angeles)

“Dresses. I wish they were all bags and all alike, to jump into quick.”Greta Garbo

Source: Rilla Page Palmborg (1931)

 

Greta Garbo Mata Hari

“I am in deadly earnest when I say that a film star’s career is a whole time job.”Greta Garbo

Source: 1932

Photo: Mata Hari (1931)

 

Mata Hari (1931)

 

Photography Prints

 

Greta Garbo caricature 1931

Artist: Nino Za. Year: 1931.

 

Greta Garbo

“I should want to retire from the screen altogether. I should want to forget that I had ever been Greta Garbo.”Greta Garbo

Source: 1932

Photo: Grand Hotel (1932)

 

Grand Hotel (1932)

 

Garbo Gilbert Mickey

Mickey Mouse toasting Garbo and John Gilbert. Taken from a magazine from the 1930s.

 

 

 

Garbo laugh

“When she laughs, it’s a silent, breathless kind of laugh, that shakes her whole person but makes very little noise. She likes to be led and is easily influenced by anyone she admires… she probably isn’t very happy.”Nils Asther

 

Greta Garbo The Painted Veil

Greta Garbo. Artist: Aris Bacci. Year: 1933. Gouache painting on card stock. 12 x 19 inches.

An experimental (and rejected) promotional item for the MGM film The Painted Veil (1934).

 

Greta Garbo (Bizarre Los Angeles)

“She is the dream princess of eternity, the knockout of the ages.”Life Magazine in 1928

Photo: Clarence Sinclair Bull

 

“Being in the newspapers is awfully silly to me. I have nothing to contribute.” – Greta Garbo (Bizarre Los Angeles)

“Being in the newspapers is awfully silly to me. I have nothing to contribute.”Greta Garbo

Photo: C.S. Bull

 

Greta Garbo

“There are many things in your heart you can never tell to another person. They are you, your private joys and sorrows, and you can never tell them. You cheapen yourself, the inside of yourself, when you tell them.”Greta Garbo

 

Greta Garbo

“I cannot manage, like these wonderful American girls, to do so many things at once – pictures, society, love. If I make pictures, I make pictures. If I make love emotions for camera, I have none [left] over for real life.”Greta Garbo

 

 

 

Dietrich Garbo Hepburn Anna Sten

Caricature of Anna Sten, Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo and Katharine Hepburn. Artist: W. Cotton. 1934.

Source: Valentino Vamp

 

Greta Garbo

“There are few very beautiful people. Garbo was one.”Luise Rainer

 

 

“I cannot explain my preference. All I know is that I have a tremendous admiration for Miss Garbo. One cannot explain her. She has genius.” Marlene Dietrich in 1937

Photo: C.S. Bull (1937)

 

“There’s no need to have beautiful features in order to be beautiful. It is the overall arrangement and its particular harmony that gives the impression of beauty. But in Greta‘s case every single feature was not only boldly designed but perfect by itself. Nothing was small in her face. A broad, high forehead, a strong, chiselled nose, a wide mouth, and most impressive of all, enormous dark blue eyes set under eyebrows curved like butterfly wings….To me, though, the unique quality of her face showed at its best when she was displeased. In Greta‘s face, even her frown was a thing of beauty.”Lilli Palmer

Source: Change Lobsters and Dance: An Autobiography (1975)

 

Leopold Stokowski and Greta Garbo in Italy, circa 1938.

“She had tried everything to be able to spend at least her holidays in peace. When Garbo-hunting was at its height and she was travelling in Italy for the first time with Leopold Stokowski, she was advised to come to a gentleman’s agreement with the press: she would meet them for an hour, be interviewed, and pose without dark glasses, in return for a few days peace in Venice. The reporters enthusiastically accepted, both sides gave their word of honour, and Greta patiently answered questions and posed for pictures. When she said good-bye to them and hour later and left the hotel, on foot, the laughing, howling horde of photographers pursued her just as before.” —Lilli Palmer

Source: Change Lobsters and Dance: An Autobiography (1975)

Photo: 1938. With Leopold Stokowski.

 

Greta Garbo

“Love makes the world go round.”Greta Garbo

Source: May Mann (1941)

Photo: C.S. Bull

 

“I have only been on a ballroom floor twice in my life. Both times I sat down because I did not like it. I cannot dance.”Greta Garbo

Source: May Mann (1941)

 

Greta Garbo 1946

“As far as my career is concerned, I’m just drifting.”Greta Garbo

Source: 1946

Photo: Cecil Beaton (1946)

 

Greta Garbo bust

Artist: Jo Davidson. Year: Pre-1952. 4 3/8 inches high and 7 ¼ inches wide with base.

 

“Her entire life was devoted to finding some way to spend her days unrecognized and anonymous as other people do. The harder she tried, the more persistently the press and the general public pursued her. Garbo hadn’t made a picture in twenty years, but people still felt the urge to stare as closely as possible into her face.”Lilli Palmer

Source: Change Lobsters and Dance: An Autobiography (1975)

 

The photographers [in Italy] were triumphantly waiting for us, surrounded by a crowd of people. Greta realized that it was hopeless, and climbed stony-faced behind me up the steps to the dock. At the top the crowd was waiting. For the first time in my life, I was physically afraid. I thought that any minute I would be crushed, smothered, or at best thrown into the water….

Fortunately the photographers at the front of the crowd were as badly off as we were; they were being pushed into us and thus couldn’t take any pictures. They had a hard enough time protecting their cameras. ‘La Divina!’ yelled the frenzied crowd, surging forward. A minute more and we’d have all been in the water, with the photographers and the fans on top of us.

[George] Schlee had his arm around Greta, Rex [Harrison] was punching anyone within reach – but the rescue came from the photographers, who hit out at the crowd with their tripods, yelling wildly in Italian. Finally we made an opening and fought our way through to the jeep, kicking anyone who got in the way. For once, the jeep started immediately and we roared off, panting and completely unnerved. It was much worse than I had imagined it. “I only know the rear entrances of the hotels I stay in,” Greta had once said to me. “I always have to climb over garbage cans and hampers full of dirty linen and sneak up to my room on foot or in the service elevator.”

Source: Lilli Palmer‘s book, Change Lobsters and Dance: An Autobiography (1975)

Photo: Taken in Rapollo, Italy, in 1953. With Rex Harrison.

 

“I’d like to give a party for you aboard the Sister Ann”, said Wallis [Duchess of Windsor] benevolently. “I have no dress” murmured Greta. “Then it will be an informal party”, said Wallis with a glance at her husband, who nodded eagerly. All right. Tomorrow at eight in the harbor. The general conversation languished….

“When the news leaked out that she was coming to visit us in Portofino, the post office engaged extra mail carriers to stagger up the steep path to our house with hampers of letters and packages.

“What shall I do with them?” I asked her. She didn’t even glance at the pile of baskets, in the entrance hall. “Throw them in the sea,”she said. ‘But the packages. They’re marked “Gift” and they’ve all got return addresses. ‘Throw them in the sea. Up at our house she was safe. Only the jeep could negotiate the path, and a high wire fence kept mountain climbers at a distance. We spend the days on the terrace, chatted, sat quietly in the sun, or went for Greta‘s beloved walks in the olive groves behind the house.

Source: Lilli Palmer‘s book, Change Lobsters and Dance: An Autobiography (1975)

Photo: Portofino…with the Duke of Windsor, circa 1950s.

 

“Her daily walks were her religion; she withered when she was deprived of them. I once collected her from Onassis’s giant boat and she moaned, ‘It is too small! I cannot go for my walks!'” — Lilli Palmer

Source: Lilli Palmer‘s book, Change Lobsters and Dance: An Autobiography (1975)

Photo: In Monoco, after leaving the Onassis’s yacht in 1958.

 

“I’m not sure she is still speaking to me after I wrote about the wild party in Portofino in the book, but there’s no way to tell. She never speaks to anybody. How I regret all those years she used to visit us, because I never took any photos of her. She had enormous feet and she always said, ‘ I have never seen a hotel lobby; all my life I have only seen the basements and cellars of hotels sneaking in and our in the night and climbing over dirty laundry.”Lilli Palmer

Source: 1978

Photo: 1960s

 

 

 

 

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