Long Beach

Long Beach photos

Posted on Posted in Iconic Locales

This turn of the 20th Century postcard is confusing because it claims that Long Beach, California, had the longest beach on the Pacific Coast.

However, Long Beach Peninsula in Washington State is considered the longest beach in the United States (some say the world, though this claim is disputed).

If that isn’t confusing enough, several websites claim that the longest beach in California is actually Santa Monica.

So…What gives?

 

An outdoor concert in Long Beach, circa 1907.

An outdoor concert, circa 1907.

 

Long_Beach_pier_and_pavilion,_taken_from_the_beach_with_gulls_in_the_foreground,_ca.1910_(CHS-5440)

Long Beach Pier and Pavilion, ca.1910 (CHS-5440)

 

Long Beach Bath House 1910

A man standing in front of the Long Beach Bath House (“The Plunge”) around 1910.

 

Long Beach 1912

A novelty photo from 1912.

 

Long Beach Christmas 1920

Celebrating Christmas in 1920.

 

Strand Theatre Pike Ave Long Beach 1924A man approaches the Strand Theatre at 231 – 237 W. Pike Ave in Long Beach, California, c. 1924. The theatre’s marquee in the background reads, David Warfield in Merchant of Venice.

Warfield’s theatrical production toured California that year, but it had disappointing ticket sales.

 

Long Beach Pirate Girls 1928

Pirate girls in a celebratory publicity junket shortly before the building of the 1928 Pacific Southwest Exposition. The girls arrived by ship and planted a cornerstone shaped as a Captain Kidd treasure chest on the Expo site.

The Exposition itself was a celebration of the Spanish explorers, padres and settlers who established California. From all indications, it was a grand celebration.

Photo was taken in May of 1928.

 

Boating Long Beach 1928

Taking a spin by motorboat around the harbor in 1928, while promoting the Pacific Southwest Exposition. (LAPL)

 

Snake Charmer Long Beach 1928

Two women posing with a snake at the 1928 Pacific Southwest Exposition. (LAPL)

 

Long Beach Polytechnic High

Golfing class at the Long Beach Polytechnic High School sometime in the late 1920s. A marching band practices in the background.

 

Dancing Long Beach 1930

Dancers, c. 1930.

 

Native American Monkey Races Long Beach

This 1930 photo was taken at The Pike amusement park in Long Beach. Native Americans in costume sit next to go-carts driven by monkeys while other Native Americans stand nearby. This was part of a sideshow offered at the park.

Snake Long Beach Pike

A snake on the beach. Circa 1930 or so. (LAPL)

 

Long Beach Flood 1937

Coping with a flood in 1937.

 

Belmont Shores Long Beach

Threatening waves crash against a sea wall around the 6000 block of East Ocean Boulevard in Belmont Shore, a neighborhood in Long Beach. Date: 1939.(LAPL)

 

 

 

 

Cyclone Racer Long Beach

A great nostalgic view of the Cyclone Racer in Long Beach, one of the more famous coasters ever created. The wooden structure was completed in 1930 and demolished in 1968. Since then, a few coaster aficionados have campaigned for the reconstruction of the coaster for new generations to enjoy. (Photo: Long Beach Historical Society)

Here is the coaster as a motion picture location for Strike Me Pink in 1936:

 

Women Dragon 1940

Fighting a dragon, circa early 1950s.

 

Nu-PikeThe Nu-Pike Amusement Park’s Double Ferris Wheel, circa 1960.

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2 thoughts on “Long Beach photos

  1. My mother died while riding the cyclone roller coaster at Long Beaches Nu Pike in California in 1978. Freak accident according to the newpaper and cornors report. Her name was Sandra Magana, maiden(Motley) .
    I wonder why there are no records of this on line. Most of the history of Nu Pike say it was closed in 1968. Someone sure made a mistakr. It was closed in 1978, they began to disamant it in 1979. I really wish someone would correct the historical record. My mom died saving the life of a young girl naned Chastity Silveroli. I think my mom deserved to be honored for that, thanks

    1. The Cyclone Racer was torn down in 1968. You mother could not have died on that ride because it was no longer there!

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