Constance Talmadge 1917

Constance Talmadge – photos and quotes

Posted on Posted in Famous Visitors, Silent Film Stars

“I used to dress up in my best and go over to the Vitagraph studio in New York, where Norma was working, hoping somebody would see me and want me. I was little and skinny, and I guess I got in everybody’s way. But I used to dress up in all the different kind of rigs I could get hold of, dreaming of the day when some director would point me out and say: ‘There’s the very type I’ve been looking for.’ But nobody did. Then one day I heard them say they were looking for a homely, skinny little girl to play a bit. My vanity was all gone by that time. ‘Will I do?” I asked. The director pulled one of my taffy-colored pigtails and told me I was a bit too homely and too skinny, but I might try!’ Thus were all my dreams dispelled, but thus did I become a motion picture actress.”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

 

Norma Constance Talmadge 1922“At home we used to play show in the cellar, and we made mother come as audience, and when she didn’t  like the show, we used to lock her in so she’d have to stay. It was pretty damp and cold down there, and mother caught rheumatism, but Norma and I were the actresses, so she stood it with fairly good grace. Sometime we had a circus. Once we locked all the neighborhood cats and dogs into the cellar for the wild animals. We heard a terrible tumult in the night, and in the morning we found a dead kitten and two badly mauled dogs. We were awfully sorry about that, because we loved animals.”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917).

Photo: With Norma Talmadge.

 

Constance Talmadge Mountain Girl Intolerance“Do you know, I believe I had an ancestor who was a mountain girl?”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Photo: Carpenter (1916)

 

Constance Talmadge Intolerance 1916“I went to see Mr. Griffith in New York one day with Norma. Right away he exclaimed, ‘The Mountain Girl!’ I was a bit angry and puzzled. ‘Mountain Girl indeed!’ I glanced down at my smart new tailor suit, at my modish shoes and gloves. Then I decided it must be my hat, – that it probably wasn’t on straight. I was pretty mad, but of course I didn’t say anything. He kept looking at me, and by and by, he asked us to go for a ride in his new car. We went, and he dashed around corners and across streets at a terrible rate. I sat with him and enjoyed it hugely. And when I laughed with joy when we dashed through the throngs, – two policemen stopped us at different times, – he again said, ‘The mountain girl.’ I guess he was testing me out to see if I were really as daring as I looked. I’m glad he found out that I was.”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Photo: Intolerance (1916)

 

“Two women sat behind me at the Auditorium, the other night. They said: ‘Of course she never really drove those horses herself. Somebody doubled for her.’ Know what I did? I turned around and told them: ‘I wish I could show you my knees, all black and blue even yet from being cracked up against the dashboard of that chariot!’ And I had an awful fear of horses, too, before that, – they were the only things I ever was really afraid of, I think.”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Intolerance (1916)

 

“My two pet aversions were forced upon me in ‘Intolerance.’ I had to drive horses, – and drive them like mad; and I loathe onions – and I had to eat them. As the scene wasn’t satisfactory – I guess I made an awful face or something, – I had to eat them again. And then as they wanted another picture of the scene anyhow, why I had to eat them again.”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Intolerance (1916)

 

“It wasn’t an easy matter getting used to the horses. First I fed them lumps of sugar to get on the good side of them. Then I drove them slowly around the studio lot attached to a light wagon. Next they were taken to San Pedro, where there is a big expanse of country, and I drove them fast, and then faster. Of course there were sentinels posted about the field to see that no harm came to me. Sam is the leading horse’s name, and I mean to buy him, – he is also a saddle horse, – and learn to ride as soon as I can get time. I guess I nearly drove over everybody who took part in ‘Intolerance.’ It was such fun to see the crowd skurry when I started for them. I’m going to have a chariot to go shopping in. It would be so much more exciting than a regular car. Fancy how mad I would make the traffic cops by driving down Broadway at full tilt in a chariot!”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Intolerance (1916)

 

“I had to learn how to shoot a bow and arrow when I was a kid, out on my grandmother’s farm in New York, – oh yes, I have a wounded cow or two to my credit, back there; so the shooting didn’t come so hard. But I didn’t shoot very straight, I’m afraid, for when I left the scene, two or three extras were picking arrows out of their anatomies. I got hit on the head with a couple of rocks, during the battle scenes, and was bowled right over once. That’s where a nice little story comes in. It was about the nicest thing I ever knew an actor to do. There was an angry man, who was really registering well in the picture, but when he saw me go down, outside the camera lines, he rushed over and carried me to a place of safety. Some hero, eh? Willing even to forego the camera. And anybody that’s worked in pictures knows what that means.” — Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Intolerance (1916)

 

“About milking the goat? Of course I had to learn, and it was such fun. I milked old Nanny dry, and we had to wait a day before the picture could be taken. How did I happen to bite her ear in that scene? Why Mr. Griffith called out to me just then, ‘do something funny.’ I had been dying all along to bite Nanny’s ear, just to see her jump. So I did that.”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Intolerance (1916)

 

Constance Talmadge 1917

From 1917.

 

Who Cares? 1919 Constance Talmadge

Who Cares? (1919). A lost film.

 

Constance Talmadge stars in the 1923 silent comedy Dulcy. The film is considered lost.

Purchase your Fine Art America Print, Coffee Mug, T-Shirt, etc. of this image by pressing here!

 

Constance Talmadge Her Sister from Paris 1925“Am I domestic? I am not. I can’t cook and don’t want to, and I’m not sure I haven’t the slightest idea on which finger you put on a thimble when you sew. I don’t mean to marry for years and years, either, – I’m too happy as I am.”Constance Talmadge

Source: Grace Kingsley (1917)

Photo: Her Sister From Paris (1925)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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